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Posts Tagged ‘Blu and Exile Soul Amazing’

19. The Tallest Man On Earth –Troubles Will Be Gone

Singer Kristian Matsson’s folksy laments sound like they have been filtered through Bob Dylan’s wounded larynx. Either the Swede has had too much lighter fluid go down his throat or the honeyed sandpaper-grating vocals come naturally to him. I can picture flower children huddling up and wailing about stuff that Papa Roach would base their music upon several cultures later, as The Tallest Man On Earth’s The Wild Hunt album plays in the background. Being free-spirited and lonesome at the same time would have been too much of an effort for those goddam hippies.

18. Feist & Ben Gibbard – The Train Song

Ben Gibbard, vocalist for Death Cab For A Cutie, and Canadian singer Leslie Feist, came together to create this featherweight alt ballad for Dark Was the Night – a compilation release supporting the Red Hot Organization. Their dueling vocals create the sort of chill that bites through our cheeks during those cold nights, backed by lovely mellow acoustic breeze. Highly recommended for corporate cabin-dwellers to help daydream about lonesome trains whistling through dusky meadows.

17. Black Rebel Motorcycle Club – Suddenly

Bands like these, I tell you, they come, do their thing and bow out. No one pimps their ride, we don’t see their cribs, and we haven’t a clue what happens backstage at their concerts. Black Rebel Motorcycle Club play spaced-out garage rock. And how. On the 2003 album Take Them On, On Your Own, their music felt darker and more strung out than ever before, as evidenced by this sweaty mantra that drips of some serious psychedelia.

16. Mudville – Hero Of The World

Marilyn Carino and Benny Cha Cha comprise the Manhattan-based Mudville. They make a delicious cocktail of neo soul, jazz rock, minimalist pop and lucid trip hop. Their 2005 The Glory of Man is Not in Vogue album is chockfull of enchanting electronica. Carino’s impressive vocals that harkens back to the glory days of Memphis soul is a perfect bedmate to Benny’s brooding instrumentation, especially on drawling moments such as this one.

15. Orphans and Vandals – Metropes

“It’s been quite a while since indie music has drawn me with such allure. Imagine ‘American Pie’ explosively rewritten by Liam Gallagher and sung by a younger, fitter Lou Reed piss drunk on malt whiskey. If you prefer not to, then you should know that Metropes is a fantastic piece of rock n’ roll storytelling.” Orphans and Vandals, ladies and germs.

14. Blu and Exile – Soul Amazing

MC Blu’s silky smooth flow sticks to DJ Exile’s über-swank production like a George Bush glance towards something shiny and useless. Nearly every track in their debut Below The Heavens is a great example of how much hip hop has evolved and turned from a form of social protest into a channel of cultural communication. This is, as some audiophiles refer to, all killer no filler.

13. Gnarls Barkley – Smiley Faces

The insane popularity of Gnarls Barkley’s debut St. Elsewhere was one of those rare instances where the masses took kindly to clever pop music as the industry credited its musicians for defying categorization. Fittingly, the music video for this track has Danger Mouse and Cee Lo randomly popping in during pivotal moments in the history of pop culture. The song too is a collage of sounds that could have made waves during different periods of time. Heck, in all of them, probably.

12. Moneybrother – Born Under A Broken Sign

Former Monster vocalist Anders Wendin is the brains behind Moneybrother, a band that blurs the line between Sixties garage pop and Nineties’ indie punk. The glorious lalalaaas that greet us during the first 15 seconds quickly settle down and burst into a soulful funky groove as Wendin sighs, “I’ve been born under a badly broken sign. He’s also a Grammy award winner…in Sweden that is. Great song to drive your car into a lamppost and sheepishly crawl out with a smile on your face. Yes, that happened.

11. Jo Yeong-Wook – The Last Waltz (Download)

South Korean composer Jo Yeong-Wook, a longtime collaborator with director Park Chan-Wook, strings together pieces of passing beauty and gets them high on classical jazz and film noir tunes. The final scene in Park Chan’s Oldboy with its protagonist Dae-su Oh vacantly smiling at the screen, with snow falling like a famous portrait beckoned it to, is made even more memorable through this exquisite composition.

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